CNUW’S MISSION

A Place to Learn-Engage-Connect focusing on Sonoran Desert Biodiversity, Education, and Conservation

About CNUW and its Mission

The Center for Native and Urban Wildlife (CNUW) was developed by the College’s Life Science faculty in 2000. CNUW was built into the framework of the Biology Department to pursue a mission of:

  1. Educating people about the importance of conserving desert habitats and its biodiversity.
  2. Maintaining, enhancing and restoring public and private open spaces to benefit native and urban plants and animals.
  3. Providing opportunities for individuals and groups to contribute to the recovery, preservation and study of the Sonoran Desert

CNUW logo

What We Do!

The Center for Native & Urban Wildlife is here for students and people to gain knowledge about conservation and help preserve and restore our Sonoran Desert.

Some of the Center for Native & Urban Wildlife projects include restoration work at Brown’s Ranch in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve along with projects which include butterfly surveys, small mammal surveys and plant research at the preserve.

A great opportunity for students is to get involved is to join The Central Arizona Conservation Society of Conservation Biology (CACSCB). They have many types of volunteer and paid internships available. Check out their website https://cacscb.org/

CNUW projects on campus include bird surveys, a phenology research, and development of new technology for people to learn more about our campus habitat. Becoming a member of eBird and iNaturalist are great ways to help contribute to Citizen Science and enjoy our campus biodiversity.

Citizen Science is an important way to help research and protect the biodiversity that exists here on campus and around the globe. Be Part of the Solution!

eBird  |  iNaturalist 

How to Help!

CNUW has created a wealth of hands-on learning opportunities for SCC students interested in conservation biology, restoration ecology, wildlife biology, ecological research and elementary education. Follow us on Facebook, bookmark our website (cnuw.scottsdalecc.edu)

“Be Part of the Solution” and meet some like minded people. Send email to: edward.weigand@scottsdalecc.edu or natalie.case@scottscdalecc.edu

CNUW’S MISSION

A Place to Learn-Engage-Connect focusing on Sonoran Desert Biodiversity, Education, and Conservation

About CNUW and its Mission

The Center for Native and Urban Wildlife (CNUW) was developed by the College’s Life Science faculty in 2000. CNUW was built into the framework of the Biology Department to pursue a mission of:

  1. Educating people about the importance of conserving desert habitats and its biodiversity.
  2. Maintaining, enhancing and restoring public and private open spaces to benefit native and urban plants and animals.
  3. Providing opportunities for individuals and groups to contribute to the recovery, preservation and study of the Sonoran Desert

CNUW logo

What We Do!

The Center for Native & Urban Wildlife is here for students and people to gain knowledge about conservation and help preserve and restore our Sonoran Desert.

Some of the Center for Native & Urban Wildlife projects include restoration work at Brown’s Ranch in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve along with projects which include butterfly surveys, small mammal surveys and plant research at the preserve.

A great opportunity for students is to get involved is to join The Central Arizona Conservation Society of Conservation Biology (CACSCB). They have many types of volunteer and paid internships available. Check out their website https://cacscb.org/

CNUW projects on campus include bird surveys, a phenology research, and development of new technology for people to learn more about our campus habitat. Becoming a member of eBird and iNaturalist are great ways to help contribute to Citizen Science and enjoy our campus biodiversity.

Citizen Science is an important way to help research and protect the biodiversity that exists here on campus and around the globe. Be Part of the Solution!

eBird  |  iNaturalist 

How to Help!

CNUW has created a wealth of hands-on learning opportunities for SCC students interested in conservation biology, restoration ecology, wildlife biology, ecological research and elementary education. Follow us on Facebook, bookmark our website (cnuw.scottsdalecc.edu)

“Be Part of the Solution” and meet some like minded people. Send email to: edward.weigand@scottsdalecc.edu or natalie.case@scottscdalecc.edu

STUDENT PROJECTS AND RESEARCH

CNUW is partnering with Arizona Game & Fish this fall for all kinds of great projects to get involved in and make a positive impact. Please let me know if you’re interested in participating at edward.weigand@scottsdalecc.edu

  • Black-Footed Ferret Spotlighting
  • Black-tailed Prairie Dog Trapping
  • Cormorant Counts
  • Small Mammal Trapping
  • Colorado Pikeminnow & Roundtail Chub Harvest & Sorting
  • The Mule Deer Foundation
  • Buck Springs Allotment Fence Removal
  • The Audubon Society/Arizona Game & Fish Department
  • Bubbling Ponds Trail Maintenance

SCC has new projects for students to observe biodiversity on campus. Become a member of eBird and iNaturalist and start to observe and record the amazing wildlife and plants that are on campus. Citizen Science is an important way to help research and protect the biodiversity that exists here on campus and around the globe. Be Part of the Solution!

eBird Application   |   iNaturalist Application

Phenolgy Observations: Phenology refers to the key seasonal changes in plants and animals from year to year. Become a Citizen Scientist in your region. It easy and fun and provides important data for scientist studying the dramatic changes taking place in plants and animals. Check out Natures Notebook online and sign up to be a observer.

Solitary Bee Studies: We are currently in the process of developing bee posts to embark on studies that observe the interaction of solitary bees with their nesting environments.

Native Propagation: Growing native plants and trees to help with restoration of lands on and off campus.

Burrowing Owl Nests: Students observe burrowing owl pairs on campus, and make-sure artificial burrows are habitable.

Bird Surveys: A variety of bird species visit the campus. With the continued observation and documentation of these species we hope to compile data on when these birds visit and what plant life they prefer.

Pollination Studies: Along with the solitary bees, many other important pollinators exist in the Sonoran desert. We make an effort to landscape with native pollinator plants and hope to diversify the ecosystem here at SCC.

SCC’S BURROWING OWL CAM

Scottsdale Community College has been sharing our campus with burrowing owls for over 40 years and we continue to support a population of burrowing owls as well as a few other critters that need a place to hang out for a while.

cottontail too skunk in nest

Live Owl Cam


Live
streaming video by Ustream

CAMPUS BIODIVERSITY

Scottsdale Community College is situated on 160 acres leased from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. The campus is comprised of a variety of habitats ranging from urban to desert, with approximately three-quarters of the land developed.

The Center for Native and Urban Wildlife strongly supports using native plants wherever possible, to enhance habitat for native wildlife. The campus boasts impressive biodiversity figures, considering that much of the land is developed or semi-urban. For example, over 113 species of birds have been observed, and many birds nesting sites have been documented.

Learn how to support backyard pollinators by building your own solitary bee posts. Check out the link below to see how over 1,000 specfies of solitary bees in Arizona help pollinate and support native Sonoran Desert plants and trees.

SCC Native Plants  |  SCC Exotic Plants

BIODIVERSITY: To learn more read Professor Roy Barnes’ essay.

“The diversity of life forms, so numerous that we have yet
to identify most of them, is the greatest wonder of this planet.”
~ E.O. Wilson

SCC Fish Amphibians Reptiles
SCC Invertebrates
SCC Birds
SCC Mammals

What is Biodiversity?

Biodiversity is the “variety of life,” including varied organisms, their genes, and their ecosystems.  This diversity is continually changing through the Earth’s and our lifetimes.  Biological diversity today is in decline due to many factors like over-exploitation, pollution and disease.  The greatest contributor to this loss is habitat destruction.  Our home, the Sonoran Desert, is not exempt from species loss.  In Arizona alone, 46 species are federally listed as endangered or threatened species and the state has lost 90% of its riparian ecosystems since the 1920s.

In 1990, Arizona voters approved an initiative to “preserve, protect and enhance” Arizona’s wildlife and biological diversity.  What we consider pristine nature is based upon our experiences with the natural world in our youth and knowing what species once existed in a given region compared to what lives there today.  Preserving biodiversity has human, ecological and ethical values.

The Center for Native and Urban Wildlife at Scottsdale Community College is involved in the preservation and protection of Arizona’s biodiversity.  In order to better understand the changes over time in our local biodiversity, we need comprehensive baseline data, including inventories of species routinely or periodically inhabiting our area. We have partnered with several organizations to help in biodiversity improvements in our community.

MUSEUM AND FACILITIES

toadhallToad Hall – the Hall of Biodiversity Present:
The gateway for elementary education tours, headquarters for various outreach education efforts in the community, and the hub for all the activities and functions of the Center for Native and Urban Wildlife. Click here – Toad Hall.

Dinosaur Exhibit – the Hall of Biodiversity Past:
Features replicas of dinosaur skulls (including the Tyrannosaurus Rex) and teeth including the saber-toothed tiger), and LIVE soft-shell turtles, one of the few survivors left from the age of the dinosaurs.  Students can also learn about recently extinct species in Arizona.  See more

wildlife demonstration gardensDemonstration Gardens:
To educate and demonstrate how landscaping with native plants benefits native wildlife and biodiversity, saves water, reduces the need for large amounts of pesticides and fertilizers, and is attractive. Click here

Greenhouse and Vivarium:
In fall 2011 we unveiled a new greenhouse by the baseball fields on the north side of campus, and our  desert tortoises have a new vivarium by the art building. These new facilities are better than ever! We are using the greenhouse for a seed bank which is a fundraiser for CNUW.

prop yardOutdoor Plant Propagation Yard:
The purpose of the prop yard is to grow easily transplantable desert tree and shrub species for habitat restoration projects in damaged desert ecosystems. Photo at left: Young Mesquite trees being grown in protective cylinders. Currently, CNUW staff and volunteers are working on growing native trees for restoration projects.

TOURS FOR 4TH GRADERS

Education Today, Preservation Forever

Our goal for the biodiversity education program is to increase awareness about the values of natural desert environments and the importance of Sonoran Desert biodiversity. We provide a 3.5 hour biodiversity field trip and Teachers Guide containing activities and information which target one-third of the Arizona State science standard. Our education program has been featured in several magazine articles. Our education facilities have attracted over 20,000 elementary school students.

Tours are led by CNUW staff and volunteers. Tours are offered on Tuesday Mornings as detailed in the calender below. Please make sure to scroll down to see the dates and book your tour. Spots are filling quickly!

To schedule a visit, please call Ed Weigand (480) 423-6731 or email me at edward.weigand@scottsdalecc.edu

Tour Dates:  Tours take place on Tuesdays

FALL 2018 Semester SPRING  2019 Semester
January 15- Anderson Elementary
November 6- Kiva Elementary January 22- Anderson Elementary
November 20- Hawthorne Elem January 29- Phoenix Montessori
December 4- Banner Elementary February 5- Lindbergh Elementary
December 11- Hohokum Elem February 12-  Waggoner Elem
February 26- Washington Elem
March 19-Longfellow
March 26-  Madison Env Club
April 2- Navajo Elementary
April 9

TESTIMONIALS:  Comments from Students and Teachers

PARTNERS AND LINKS

Partners

Arizona Game and Fish Department go to website
Audubon Arizona go to website
City of Scottsdale Environment & Preservation Dept. go to website
Desert Foothills Land Trust go to website
Liberty Wildlife go to website
McDowell Sonoran Conservancy go to website
Riparian Institute go to website
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) go to website
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency go to website
FireScience Online (Forestry Careers Guide) go to website
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community go to website
Sky Island Alliance go to website
Game Warden Org http://www.gamewarden.org/
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum go to website
Arizonensis go to website
Desert Botanical Garden go to website
Desert Rivers Audubon Society  go to website
Environmental Fund for Arizona go to website
National Wildlife Federation go to website
Native Seeds Search go to website
Richard Louv go to website
Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area go to website
Southwest Wildlife Rehabilitation and Educational Foundation, Inc. go to website
The Green Frog News go to website
Tonto National Forest go to website
Forestry Degree go to website
Mercy for Animals   go to websiteInternational Wolf Center  go to website
Animal Rights – http://www.wiseoldsayings.com/animal-rights-quotes/

Cooperation

The Center for Native and Urban Wildlife facilities and website would not have been possible without considerable support from many local community organizations. In particular we would like to thank the following organizations, to which we owe our deepest gratitude:

The Nina Mason Pulliam Trust
The McDowell Sonoran Conservancy
The Desert Foothills Land Trust
Arizona Game & Fish Department
The Riparian Institute
The Liberty Wildlife Foundation
The City of Scottsdale, Arizona
CNUW CONTRIBUTORS

Thank You to Everyone Who Has Contributed to CNUW 2000 ~ 2017

Directors

Dr. John Weser (2014 – present)
Russ Haughey (2010-2013)
Roy A. Barnes (2003-2010)
Virginia Korte (2000-2003)

Special “Toady Awards” (April 24, 2003)

Carla
Mike Demlong
Ray Leimkuhler (SCC student)
Megan Mosby
Dr. Irwin Noyes
Tyler Peterson (SCC student)
Carol Schatt
Vicki Wolf

Volunteers

Jim Evans (environmental education)
Gretchen Ishler (environmental education)
Michaela Morris (animal and plant care)
Greg Skrivanek (plant care)
Paul B. Walters (facilities care)
Liberty Wildlife Foundation (environmental education)

Docents

Charleen Blanford
Molly Corral (née Lamm)
Andrew Cummings
Adrianna DeFranco
Kathleen Grigg
Cheryl Kerivan
Ray Leimkuehler
Patricia Quinn-Ortiz
Jean Rigden

Artists – Toad Hall & Hall of Biodiversity Past

Joanne Battershall (Toad Hall quilt of native animals)
Kathy Farnsworth (Toad Hall animal sketches)
Ray Leimkuehler (Toad Hall mural)
Johanna Pluntke (Toad Hall mural)
Michael Schutz (dinosaur mural)

Photographers

Roy A. Barnes
Andrew Cummings
Dr. Barbara Fahey
John Fitzpatrick
Chanda Kim
Dr. John Nagy
Krya Perry
Jean Rigden
Dr. John Weser

Restoration Work

Natalie Case
Andrew Cummings
Stacy Fisher (née Pratt)
Christopher Kolstad
Ray Leimkuehler
Meg White
Thomas Williams

Writers – Website

Roy A. Barnes
Molly Corral (née Lamm)
Andrew Cummings
Adrianna DeFranco
Xanthe Hallman (née Skjelfjord)
Jean Rigden
Ivette Vargas

Writers – Newsletter

Roy A. Barnes
Molly Corral (née Lamm)
Adrianna DeFranco
Stacy Fisher (née Pratt)
Kathleen Grigg
Xanthe Hallman (née Skjelfjord)

Office Administrators (starting with most recent)

Ed Weigand (2011 – present)
Tyler Raspiller (2010)
Emma Olsen (2008-2010)
Xanthe Hallman (née Skjelfjord) (2006-2008)
Stacy Fisher (née Pratt) (2004-2006)
Mark Harding (2000-2003)

DONATE

Fundraising Campaign

Mission Statement: Biodiversity, Education, and Preservation. CNUW exists to bring students, faculty and the community together to learn about biodiversity and foster stewardship of the plants and animals that are in our environment. CNUW projects include educational programs, museum tours, field trips, camping, hiking, research and restoration work. Since we are a non-profit we rely on the support of people like you! Thank you!

Donating by Check

Please make your check payable Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation  “CNUW Fund” on the memo line of your check.  Please include your full mailing address with your check, so that a receipt can be mailed to you.

Mail your check to:
Scottsdale Community College
ATTN: CNUW Director
for benefit of Center for Native and Urban Wildlife
9000 East Chaparral Road
Scottsdale, AZ 85256

You will recieve an official receipt for tax purposes from the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation.

CNUW’s Wishlist

Looking for another way to help?  See if you can donate any of the following items:

  • Educational tools (we want to provide research opportunities for anyone visiting CNUW)
  • Interactive touch pads
  • Used or new aquariums/tanks of multiple sizes, lights, accessories.
  • Gardening or maintenance tools.

*Generally speaking, donations to the Maricopa Foundation are tax-deductible; however, since each taxpayer’s circumstance is unique, you should consult with your personal tax advisor or accountant to determine if the gift is deductible for you.

desert pupfishgulffrittilarydesert tortoisedesert marigoldlowland leopard